Help document May 1 marches, strikes, and actions by donating photos, video, signs

20150501-LJ-mayday-4maydayposterfinalespanol4-1-17

The UW Libraries Special Collections and its Labor Archives of Washington are documenting and collecting items from the upcoming May 1, 2017, marches in the Puget Sound region.

We are interested in your:

Photographs and video of signs and crowd scenes. High-resolution files from DSLR cameras are preferred, but they will accept camera phone images. Please review your images and edit out blurry or repetitive images. To make submissions, email Ann Lally, UW Libraries digital collections curator, and in the email title or text:

  • Tell her your submissions are for a labor or labor-related organization and name the organization/banner you marched behind
  • That they are destined for the Labor Archives of Washington’s digital collections.

Labor-related physical signs and flyers used in the march. Email me, UW Libraries Labor Archivist Conor Casey, to arrange for delivery pickup of your items.

► Signs without any labor or working class/immigrant worker focus can be sent to Anne Jenner, UW Libraries Pacific Northwest curator. Email her for details.

You will be required to sign a donor form for any materials given to the UW Libraries. This form allows future researchers to use your images or materials in books, documentaries, etc. If you have questions about the donor form or copyright, email Conor Casey.

For general questions, email Ann Lally, UW Libraries digital collections curator.

New Exhibit-Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Art of Richard V. Correll

Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Art of Richard V. Correll

New Additions to the Collection of the Labor Archives of Washington State, UW Special Collections

December 6, 2012 – April 19, 2013
Special Collections Basement Lobby
Allen Library North First Floor Balcony

Richard V. (Dick) Correll (1904-1990), was “one of the leading masters of printmaking in the West.” Best known for his powerful black and white linoleum cuts, etchings and woodblock prints, for most of his life he earned a living as a commercial artist in the book publishing and advertising fields while producing a large body of fine art in his own time.
Correll’s themes ranged from landscapes, animals and agricultural scenes, harbors and ships, and music and dance to those which reflected his lifelong concern with political and social issues. This exhibit features selections from several core areas of Correll’s recently donated collection at the Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections: Images of labor, social justice, civil rights, anti-war themes, work for the Great Depression-era Federal Art Project of the Works Projects Administration, and his work for the progressive Depression-era newspaper the Voice of Action.