Marches, rallies & protests: collecting history as it happens

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The election of Donald J. Trump as the 45th President of the United States has catalyzed people both for and against him to rally, march and protest.

The University of Washington Libraries Special Collections is interested in collecting materials from these events – signs, flyers, digital photos and videos – all of which help us document this time in American history. We are interested in materials from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Alaska and British Columbia.

Since the election in November 2016 a number of protests and rallies have been held across the Pacific Northwest both for and against the new President and we are collecting materials from across the spectrum of support.  Whether you agree or disagree with the policies and have taken to the streets to make your voice heard, please get in touch and let us know if you have photos, videos, posters or flyers to donate.

As of this writing in February of 2017 additional marches, rallies and protests are being organized – we want materials from these events as well! There is little doubt that even more events will be organized in the coming years; we will be collecting these materials as well.

How to donate:

If you have signs, flyers, or other physical materials, please contact Anne Jenner, the Pacific Northwest Curator,  pnwcoll@uw.edu .

If you have digital photos or videos, contact Ann Lally, Digital Collections Curator, digcurat@uw.edu. If you are interested in donating digital items, here are a couple of guidelines:

  • prefer high resolution files from DSLR cameras, but will accept camera phone images
  • please review your images and weed out blurry or repetitive images

 

Ann Lally | Digital Collections Curator

 
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New History Resource on LGBTQ Activism in Seattle

Advertisement for UW Gay Students Association dance, ca 1971-1974

This week marks the launch of a new UW online project: the LGBTQ Activism in Seattle History Project.   Part of the larger Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project, this effort “details and documents the history of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender activism in Seattle with a narrative history, photos, oral histories, a timeline and catalog of LGBTQ activist organizations.” The resource was compiled by UW History doctoral student Kevin McKenna and features many materials from the Libraries Pacific Northwest Collection.

The site is celebrated by the campus community and activists and members of the LGBTQA community.  Kevin McKenna, who is currently teaching at Lewis and Clark in Portland, talked about the project, the oral history interviews, and the work that still needs to be done to document and bring awareness of the history and legacy of LGBTQ activism to new generations.  Kevin stated “the launch of the online project as part of the Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project is just the beginning.”

Take time to read through the website, view the digitized materials from our many collections, and watch the oral history interviews.

The PNW Collection’s LGBTQ materials continue to grow.  Visit this PNW guide to explore the LGBTQ collections (archival collections, published works, websites, and photographs) in Special Collections.

Anne Jenner
Pacific Northwest Curator

 

Courage in Action – Day of Remembrance Symposium on Gordon Hirabayashi

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Join us for the 2014 Day of Remembrance, Saturday, February 22, 2014 to honor the life and legacy of civil rights icon Gordon K. Hirabayashi.  The symposium (free and open to the public) from 1:00 to 5:00 in Kane Hall on the UW campus will feature lectures, performances and remembrances by the Hirabayashi family, and the presentation of Hirabayashi’s Presidential Medal of Freedom, awarded posthumously to Hirabayashi by President Obama in 2012.

The medal will be part of the Gordon K. Hirabayashi papers in Special Collections.  His journals, photographs, letters and legal papers were donated last year by his family and many items are on display in the Allen Library North Lobby in an exhibit titled “Civil Disobedience!”  The exhibit ends February 28.

There also will be book-signing in Kane Hall’s Walker Ames Room from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. by Lane Hirabayashi, co-author of the 2013 University of Washington Press book “A Principled Stand: The Story of Gordon Hirabayashi.”

In a related event, a play by about Hirabayashi titled “Hold These Truths,” by Jeanne Sakata, featuring actor Greg Watanabe, will be given a staged reading at Theater Off Jackson, Feb. 22 and 23.

Labor Archives of Washington Event: Public Screening and Talk: One Generation’s Time: The Legacy of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes, October 31

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One Generation’s Time: The Legacy of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes tells the story of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes, two Filipino American cannery worker activists who were murdered in Seattle in June 1981.

A free screening* of the one-hour documentary will take place, Thursday, October 31, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Museum of History and Industry, 860 Terry Ave N Seattle, WA 98109 (206) 324-1126 ext 165

Admission to the preview screening is free, however seating is limited. Doors open at 6:00 p.m.; screening at 6:10 p.m.; followed by a post-film discussion led by Seattle Channel Senior Producer.

*The screening is free but does not include museum admission. People attending the event may proceed to the screening; regular admission rates will apply only for those who wish to visit MOHAI’s galleries before the event. People attending the event to proceed to the screening but not MOHAI’s galleries.

Speakers:

Shannon Gee, who wrote, directed, photographed and edited the documentary.
Ron Chew, documentary co-producer, author of the companion book Remembering Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes: The Legacy of Filipino Labor Activism, published earlier this year by University of Washington Press.
Conor Casey, Labor Archivist from the Labor Archives of Washington, will speak about some of the archival collections that were used in the documentary and to talk about the new Cannery Worker Unions section of the Labor Archives Digital Collections Portal.

Domingo and Viernes, two reform officers in Seattle’s Alaska Cannery Workers’ Union, Local 37 of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU), were gunned down as they worked in the union offices near Pioneer Square. The men were attempting to reform the union and were calling for better working conditions in the canneries. On the surface, their murders were meant to look like just another gang-related slaying, but later were revealed to be a hit originating from the Marcos regime.

The documentary details the murders, the fight for fair labor conditions, the civil rights movement the murdered men helped foster and the ensuing efforts to seek justice for their killings.

Chew will sign copies of his book, which will be available for purchase, at the screening.

Co-Sponsors: Labor Archives of Washington, the Pacific Northwest Historians Guild, Seattle Channel, Inlandboatmen’s Union of the Pacific, the Museum of History and Industry, and the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies