New Digital Resource Documents Colonial Period in British Columbia

The University of Victoria Special Collections recently announced the completion of the initial phase of a project to digitize original dispatches between the British Colonial Office and the colonies of Vancouver Island and British Columbia.  From the UVic press release:

Faculty and staff at the University of Victoria have launched a website making transcriptions and digitized version of the 1858 Vancouver Island and British Columbia colonial correspondence available on line for the first time.  This is the first phase of a project to provide online access to over 7,000 dispatches dating from 1846 to 1871. The transcriptions were produced by Emeritus Professor James in the 1980s from difficult-to-read archival documents of all the Vancouver Island and British Columbia Colonial Despatches.  They have now been transformed from outdated Waterloo Script text files into xml and a web interface has been created in eXist, an xml database.  The entire corpus is searchable, although only 1858 has digital images, an introduction, biographies and vetted notes.

You can find out more about this new site, Colonial Despatches, and search it here.

Coincidence of the Day

Harry C. Bauer and Lulu Fairbanks examining the Eric A. Hegg photograph albums, n.d.
Harry C. Bauer and Lulu Fairbanks examining the Eric A. Hegg photograph albums, n.d.

A colleague up in the Monographic Services Division was doing a periodic cleaning out of the departmental online OCLC save file and exhumed a mysterious catalog record for the Eric A. Hegg photographs that appeared to have been sitting in limbo in this file for some time.

A quick review indicated that the record in the save file contained revisions to an earlier version of a catalog record that is supposed to point to an important collection of early photographs of Alaska (can’t seem to escape Alaska these days).  Updating the record is a simple enough task, although at times it feels strange for me to be doing this without ever having seen the collection.  But there are just too many other things going on for me to dwell upon it.

A little later in the day, however, I stumbled across the image above while searching for something else on the UW Digital Collections site, which made me feel a bit more wistful.  Due to the fragility of the original materials, we no longer have the direct access to the albums that Ms. Fairbanks enjoyed back in the day, but we can console ourselves with the thought that we now have access to selected digitized images from this same collection any time, anywhere online.

Image credit: University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections Division, Photographs of Harry C. Bauer, PH Coll 599, Order no. POR232

Working His Way Through College

In an effort to stay one step ahead of Mahrya (who is already making good progress with cleaning up the minimal level records), I decided to pull an individual scrapbook or small collection to create a record that might serve as an (obviously destined-to-be-shining) example of full level cataloging of scrapbooks.

I settled on the first item from the list (which filed that way because of the quotation marks around the creator’s first name, “Cec” Smith), the Cecil Smith scrapbooks because: a) it was small; b) the subject matter (popular music) interested me; and c) we had found a couple of cool photographs on the UW Digital Collections site while I was trying to explain the “creator” concept in the context of scrapbooks.

Since then I have compiled a few vital statistics on Smith, who seems a most interesting character (he’s the one in the center of the picture above).  The scrapbook mainly chronicles his career as a dance band leader (the band itself seems to have gone by several names) during the late 1920s/early 1930s in Seattle.  Smith supported himself as a law school student at the University of Washington through his work as a musician.  The scrapbook ends around 1937 (though there are a couple of items inserted at the back that date from the following year), following Smith’s passing of the bar exam.  He seems to have continued to play music at social functions even after he began to practice law, but the trail ends there.  I was able to determine from Ancestry.com that he died in Bellevue in 1988; presumably he spent his entire career as a lawyer in the Seattle area.  But did he continue on as a musician at all?

More digging awaits as I try to assemble these and other facts into something more lucid.

Image credit: University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections Division, Seattle Collection, Negative no.14269

Scrapbook Project to Begin

We are about to embark on the unknown.  Next week we will launch a project to begin to create catalog records for the Pacific Northwest Collection’s scrapbook collection.  The momentum for this project really began when local hero, Mark Carlson, was able to convert the data from the html table listing the (mainly uncataloged) scrapbooks on the current Special Collections Web site into MARC format.

Next week, new iSchool volunteer for Special Collections, Mahrya Carncross, will begin to take these very basic (and sometimes problematic records) and start the painstaking (but fun?) process of turning all of them (approximately 170) into acceptable minimal level records to be loaded into WorldCat.  As time allows, we hope that she also will be able to fully catalog selected scrapbooks as well.  (I’ll try to explain the distinction some other time to all of you non-catalogers out there).  Which means you shouldn’t be running into stuff like this:

040  WAU ǂc WAU
090  ǂb
049  WAUW
1102 Salmon
24510Salmon scrapbook, ǂf 1914.
300  1 ǂf volume
5202 Clippings and menus about salmon.
506  Open to all users.
540  Some restrictions may exist on duplication, quotation, or publication. Contact the repository for details.
655 0Scrapbooks.
9451 ǂl scsbf ǂt 7 ǂs – ǂy In process record; contact repository for up-to-date information

I know I’m intrigued!  We hope to be able to share some of our sure-to-be-exciting discoveries in the scrapbook collection in the coming months.

P.S. The image above does not come from the Pacific Northwest Collection (and it could depict an Atlantic salmon for all I know).  Just a shout out to our friends back East. It is a digital image of a cigarette card in the George Arents Collection, New York Public Library from the always useful and easy-to-search NYPL Digital Gallery.  Full info here.

Image credit: The Salmon, Arents cigarette cards 869, NYPL Digital Gallery Image ID 1570301

New MLIS student tour of Special Collections – success!

Nicole Bouche, Pacific Northwest Curator, lead a tour of 44 new Master’s of Library and Information Science (MLIS) students through Special Collections. Not only was the turn-out larger than anticipated, but the group was enthusiastic and had some great comments and questions.

One of the questions was, “What is the oldest thing in your collection?,” to which Nicole answered, “We have Medieval manuscripts, but the Buddhist texts may pre-date those.” Stay tuned….maybe we’ll get a firm answer from Rare Books Curator, Sandra Kroupa.

Roethke Recordings Available Online

As recently reported in the New York Times, recordings of the American poet, Theodore Roethke, reading selected works are among the latest additions to The Poetry Archive.  This project to make historic recordings of poetry read by their authors freely available to the public was initiated by U.K. Poet Laureate Andrew Motion in 2005.   With the cooperation of the Poetry Foundation, the collection has expanded its scope to include American authors.

The Special Collections Division holds many materials relating to Roethke (who was a member of the University of Washington faculty from 1947-1963), including his papers.  The Roethke papers are described in a rather complicated finding aid, which you can begin to work your way through here.  Although the collection contains many photographs, this image is from our nearby neighbor, the Museum of History and Industry.  It shows Roethke (right) with Seattle-born musician and composer, Armand Russell in an undisclosed location.  Russell, who trained at the University of Washington, played double bass with the Seattle Symphony and several other orchestras, before joining the faculty of the University of Hawaii in 1961.

Image credit: Armand Russell and Theodore Roethke, Seattle, 1955. Seattle Post-Intelligencer Collection, Museum of History & Industry, Seattle, Image No. 1986.5.41028.