Help document May 1 marches, strikes, and actions by donating photos, video, signs

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The UW Libraries Special Collections and its Labor Archives of Washington are documenting and collecting items from the upcoming May 1, 2017, marches in the Puget Sound region.

We are interested in your:

Photographs and video of signs and crowd scenes. High-resolution files from DSLR cameras are preferred, but they will accept camera phone images. Please review your images and edit out blurry or repetitive images. To make submissions, email Ann Lally, UW Libraries digital collections curator, and in the email title or text:

  • Tell her your submissions are for a labor or labor-related organization and name the organization/banner you marched behind
  • That they are destined for the Labor Archives of Washington’s digital collections.

Labor-related physical signs and flyers used in the march. Email me, UW Libraries Labor Archivist Conor Casey, to arrange for delivery pickup of your items.

► Signs without any labor or working class/immigrant worker focus can be sent to Anne Jenner, UW Libraries Pacific Northwest curator. Email her for details.

You will be required to sign a donor form for any materials given to the UW Libraries. This form allows future researchers to use your images or materials in books, documentaries, etc. If you have questions about the donor form or copyright, email Conor Casey.

For general questions, email Ann Lally, UW Libraries digital collections curator.

New Episode of “Learn Yourself”: The Seattle General Strike of 1919

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Man Speaking to crowd during the Seattle General Strike, PHColl922.20

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show, We Do the Work, will air April 11th and stream online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange thereafter! This Learn Yourself will be about the Seattle General Strike of 1919, the first city-wide strike in US history. This strike presaged a wave of postwar organizing and strikes as well as anti-labor and anti-radical repression and continues to inspire as a model for collective action today.

The regular segment, “Learn Yourself,” features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections), being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich, with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. SeaTac Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign and History Project
  4. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  5. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  6. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll
  7. Author, Poet, Worker: Carlos Bulosan’s Collections at the Labor Archives of Washington and Eva Urcia’s Quest to Uncover and Preserve Bulosan Family History
  8. The Everett Massacre Centennial Commemoration
  9. The 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike

Related Episodes
1. Former LAW intern Senteara Orwig on the collections she worked on in the Labor Archives of Washington “The Songbird and the Martyr: Katie Phar, Joe Hill, and the Songs of the Industrial Workers of the World”

For more information, go to the following sites and links:

Websites:
Seattle General Strike Project
“The Seattle General Strike and Its Aftermath” Labor Archives of Washington Digital Collections Portal 

Secondary Sources:
• Brecher, Jeremy. 1997. Strike! Boston, MA: South End Press.
• Friedheim, Robert L. 1964. The Seattle general strike. University of Washington Press: Seattle.

Films:
• Ostrander, Lucy, Maria Gargiulo, Anna Louise Strong, John Gilbert, and Marjorie Nelson. 2005. Witness to revolution: the story of Anna Louise Strong. [Seattle, Wash.]: Ostrander Productions.

Primary Sources:
• Seattle. 2009. The Seattle general strike: an account of what happened in Seattle, and especially in the Seattle Labor Movement during the general strike, February 6 to 11, 1919. Seattle, Wash: Left Bank Books and Charlatan Stew.
Robert Friedheim Seattle General Strike Collection, Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
IWW Seattle Joint Branches Records, Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
Industrial Workers of the World photograph collection, Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
King County Central Labor Council Records, Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
Broussais C. Beck papers, 1919-1961, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections

New episode of Labor Archives of Washington’s radio show on history of the 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike now streaming online

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show We Do the Work is now streaming online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange.

This ‘Learn Yourself’ will be about the pivotal 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike, which shut down ports along the West Coast for months, spurred a four-day general strike that shut down San Francisco,  and resulted in the emergence of regional leadership that would form the present day International Longshore and Warehouse Union. The strike also inspired workers for generations and reinvigorated other maritime unions, including the Sailors Union of the Pacific.

The regular segment, called “Learn Yourself”, features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections) being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. SeaTac Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign and History Project
  4. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  5. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  6. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll
  7. Author, Poet, Worker: Carlos Bulosan’s Collections at the Labor Archives of Washington and Eva Urcia’s Quest to Uncover and Preserve Bulosan Family History
  8. The Everett Massacre Centennial Commemoration
  9. The 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike

Marches, rallies & protests: collecting history as it happens

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The election of Donald J. Trump as the 45th President of the United States has catalyzed people both for and against him to rally, march and protest.

The University of Washington Libraries Special Collections is interested in collecting materials from these events – signs, flyers, digital photos and videos – all of which help us document this time in American history. We are interested in materials from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Alaska and British Columbia.

Since the election in November 2016 a number of protests and rallies have been held across the Pacific Northwest both for and against the new President and we are collecting materials from across the spectrum of support.  Whether you agree or disagree with the policies and have taken to the streets to make your voice heard, please get in touch and let us know if you have photos, videos, posters or flyers to donate.

As of this writing in February of 2017 additional marches, rallies and protests are being organized – we want materials from these events as well! There is little doubt that even more events will be organized in the coming years; we will be collecting these materials as well.

How to donate:

If you have signs, flyers, or other physical materials, please contact Anne Jenner, the Pacific Northwest Curator,  pnwcoll@uw.edu .

If you have digital photos or videos, contact Ann Lally, Digital Collections Curator, digcurat@uw.edu. If you are interested in donating digital items, here are a couple of guidelines:

  • prefer high resolution files from DSLR cameras, but will accept camera phone images
  • please review your images and weed out blurry or repetitive images

 

Ann Lally | Digital Collections Curator

 
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New episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s radio segment on the West Coast Maritime Strike of 1934 streams online this Tuesday

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment, “Learn Yourself”, on the KSVR radio show We Do the Work will stream online this Tuesday December 13, 2016 at 6:30 PM PST. You can also tune in the old fashioned way on KSVR 91.7 FM!

This “Learn Yourself” segment will feature Labor Archivist Conor Casey speaking about the West Coast Maritime Strike of 1934. For more information, go to www.laborarchives.org or email cmcasey@uw.edu.

The regular segment, called “Learn Yourself”, features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections) being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  4. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  5. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll
  6. Author, Poet, Worker: Carlos Bulosan’s Collections at the Labor Archives of Washington and Eva Urcia’s Quest to Uncover and Preserve Bulosan Family History
  7. The Everett Massacre Centennial Commemoration

New History Resource on LGBTQ Activism in Seattle

Advertisement for UW Gay Students Association dance, ca 1971-1974

This week marks the launch of a new UW online project: the LGBTQ Activism in Seattle History Project.   Part of the larger Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project, this effort “details and documents the history of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender activism in Seattle with a narrative history, photos, oral histories, a timeline and catalog of LGBTQ activist organizations.” The resource was compiled by UW History doctoral student Kevin McKenna and features many materials from the Libraries Pacific Northwest Collection.

The site is celebrated by the campus community and activists and members of the LGBTQA community.  Kevin McKenna, who is currently teaching at Lewis and Clark in Portland, talked about the project, the oral history interviews, and the work that still needs to be done to document and bring awareness of the history and legacy of LGBTQ activism to new generations.  Kevin stated “the launch of the online project as part of the Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project is just the beginning.”

Take time to read through the website, view the digitized materials from our many collections, and watch the oral history interviews.

The PNW Collection’s LGBTQ materials continue to grow.  Visit this PNW guide to explore the LGBTQ collections (archival collections, published works, websites, and photographs) in Special Collections.

Anne Jenner
Pacific Northwest Curator

 

Labor Archives of Washington’s New Television Segment Airs This Weekend on KOMO TV (Seattle), Streams online Thereafter

banner-testThe Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections,  is pleased to announce the first episode of our new segment on the news magazine show UW360. The multi-episode segment will highlight the UW Libraries, Special Collections, and the Labor Archives’ collections, researchers, and community supporters. The segment will air on KOMO TV on Sunday, October 2 at 5:30 PM and stream on various media platforms including YouTube, Roku and Amazon Fire TV, thereafter. The rest of the episodes of the series are in production and will air over the next year.
Here’s the direct link to the Labor Archives segment: http://uwtv.org/series/uw360/watch/kfs6VK-HpS4/
Here’s the link to the entire episode:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4hNwH4Untc