New episodes of Labor Archives of Washington’s radio show on Pablo O’Higgins Mural, UW Student Activists, and Ship Scalers Union now streaming online

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show We Do the Work is now streaming online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange.

This ‘Learn Yourself’ will be about the Ship Scalers Union, UW student activists, and the Pablo O’Higgins mural “The Struggle Against Racial Discrimination”, which hangs in Kane Hall at the UW Seattle campus.

For more information, go Pablo O’Higgins and Ship Scalers Union or read Becoming Pablo O’Higgins by Susan Vogel or to learn more about Gigi Peterson, go to http://www2.cortland.edu/departments/history/faculty-staff-detail.dot?fsid=%20263200 , to read her older article in Labor, https://www.lawcha.org/labor-studies-in-working-class-history.

The regular segment, called “Learn Yourself”, features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections) being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. SeaTac Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign and History Project
  4. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  5. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  6. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll
  7. Author, Poet, Worker: Carlos Bulosan’s Collections at the Labor Archives of Washington and Eva Urcia’s Quest to Uncover and Preserve Bulosan Family History
  8. The Everett Massacre Centennial Commemoration
  9. The 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike
  10. The Seattle General Strike of 1919 and its Legacy
  11. Pablo O’Higgins, Chicano Student Activists, and the Ship Scalers’ Mural Conor Casey, Labor Archivist for the Labor Archives of Washington, Gigi Peterson, Author & Historian, Part 1
  12. Pablo O’Higgins, Chicano Student Activists, and the Ship Scalers’ Mural: Conor Casey, Labor Archivist for the Labor Archives of Washington, Gigi Peterson, Author & Historian, Part 2

New Digital Collection: The Richard V. Correll prints and papers

 

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Richard Correll in his studio painting Paul Bunyan, a part of a series of paintings created for the Federal Art Project of the WPA, ca. 1938-1940.

The Labor Archives of Washington is excited to announce that the prints and papers of famous West Coast artist, Richard V. Correll, are now viewable (almost) in its entirety, on the UW Libraries Digital Collections site! Consisting primarily of original artwork created by Correll, including a variety of prints, original drawings, and paintings, the collection contains nearly the full body of his work! This collection truly demonstrates the expansiveness of his artistry both in technique and subject matter, encompassing themes of working people, civil rights, and social justice as well as nature scenes, figure drawings, Paul Bunyan, and a scrapbook of holiday cards spanning over 39 years.

 

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Fire Hose/Fight Back, 1971 (linocut print)
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“No Wars For Big Oil”, 1979 

In 2012-2013, the Labor Archives spotlighted Correll’s work in the exhibit, Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Art of Richard V. Correll. You can now view a digital version of this exhibit as well as access a web portal to the full digital collection on the Labor Archives of Washington’s Digital Resources Guide. (We even have a portable version of the physical exhibit, enabling us to take Images of Labor and Social Justice on the road!)

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Our portable Correll exhibit on display at the WA State Labor Council Convention in July 2017! (Feat. Labor Archivist, Conor Casey, and Assistant Labor Archivist, Crystal Rodgers)

The collection also includes several sketchbooks and audio recordings of an oral history interview with Correll from 1979, to be digitized, as well as books and a small series of paper ephemera, photographs, and other published material about Correll’s life and artwork. Three cd-roms donated to us with the collection contain photographs of Correll as well as additional digital photographs of his prints and illustrations. Want to learn more about the collection in its entirety? Check out the online finding aid on Archives West!

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Divers, 1986 (woodcut/collage print)

And if you’d like more background information about this prolific artist, Labor Archivist Conor Casey talks about Correll’s life and work in the May 2013 interview on KUOW and KBCS during the Northwest Folklife Festival as well as July 2016’s “Learn Yourself”, a segment of KSVR Studio’s We Do The Work radio show. Seattle’s weekly publication, the Stranger, also spotlighted the collection in an article published in February 2013!

For any specific questions about the Correll prints and papers or other labor collections at the LAW, contact Labor Archivist Conor Casey! Interested more generally in conducting research at the UW Libraries Special Collections? View our website for more information about hours and how to prepare for your visit!

“Past Forward”: Labor Archives latest exhibit on display at the LERC!

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The exhibit I curated for the Harry Bridges Labor Center for Labor Studies and the Washington State Labor Education and Research Center partnership is titled Past Forward: Snapshots of Social Justice Labor Organizing and looks at ten moments throughout the history of labor organizing in the Pacific Northwest. Organized around four progressive issues, the exhibit covers a wide range of both organized labor and labor activists’ social justice victories. To gather the stories that are told in the exhibit, I explored collections suggested by Conor Casey, the Labor Archivist and Director of Labor Archives of Washington, UW Libraries Special Collections; spoke with other labor researchers at the UW; and read up on labor history in our area using resources such as the Seattle Civil Rights & Labor History Project. The exhibit drew heavily on the collections of the Labor Archives. There are so many interesting stories to be told, and I was very excited to be able to highlight one of the earliest multicultural coalitions which fought the anti-miscegenation laws introduced in our state in the 1930s as wells as to bring the exhibit all the way to this year by including the Seattle Womxn’s March in January. Researching, curating, and writing this exhibit has contributed to my education, and it has been truly inspiring to learn about and re-visit the struggles of labor activists around race, gender, wage, and international human rights here in our region. rachel exhibit 3

– Post by Student Curator, Rachel Townsend

You can view the exhibit at the Washington State Labor Education and Research Center, located on the South Seattle College Georgetown campus (6737 Corson Ave. S, Building B, outside of Room 106). 

Help document May 1 marches, strikes, and actions by donating photos, video, signs

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The UW Libraries Special Collections and its Labor Archives of Washington are documenting and collecting items from the upcoming May 1, 2017, marches in the Puget Sound region.

We are interested in your:

Photographs and video of signs and crowd scenes. High-resolution files from DSLR cameras are preferred, but they will accept camera phone images. Please review your images and edit out blurry or repetitive images. To make submissions, Email Conor Casey, Labor Archivist, and in the email:

  • In the email title or text, note that submissions are for a labor or labor-related organization and name the organization/banner you marched behind
  • That they are destined for the Labor Archives of Washington’s digital collections.

Labor-related physical signs and flyers used in the march. Email Conor Casey, UW Libraries Labor Archivist Conor Casey, to arrange for delivery pickup of your items.

You will be required to sign a donor form for any materials given to the UW Libraries. This form allows future researchers to use your images or materials in books, documentaries, etc. If you have questions about the donor form or copyright, email Conor Casey.

For general questions, Email Conor Casey, .

New Episode of “Learn Yourself”: The Seattle General Strike of 1919

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Man Speaking to crowd during the Seattle General Strike, PHColl922.20

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show, We Do the Work, will air April 11th and stream online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange thereafter! This Learn Yourself will be about the Seattle General Strike of 1919, the first city-wide strike in US history. This strike presaged a wave of postwar organizing and strikes as well as anti-labor and anti-radical repression and continues to inspire as a model for collective action today.

The regular segment, “Learn Yourself,” features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections), being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich, with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. SeaTac Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign and History Project
  4. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  5. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  6. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll
  7. Author, Poet, Worker: Carlos Bulosan’s Collections at the Labor Archives of Washington and Eva Urcia’s Quest to Uncover and Preserve Bulosan Family History
  8. The Everett Massacre Centennial Commemoration
  9. The 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike

Related Episodes
1. Former LAW intern Senteara Orwig on the collections she worked on in the Labor Archives of Washington “The Songbird and the Martyr: Katie Phar, Joe Hill, and the Songs of the Industrial Workers of the World”

For more information, go to the following sites and links:

Websites:
Seattle General Strike Project
“The Seattle General Strike and Its Aftermath” Labor Archives of Washington Digital Collections Portal 

Secondary Sources:
• Brecher, Jeremy. 1997. Strike! Boston, MA: South End Press.
• Friedheim, Robert L. 1964. The Seattle general strike. University of Washington Press: Seattle.

Films:
• Ostrander, Lucy, Maria Gargiulo, Anna Louise Strong, John Gilbert, and Marjorie Nelson. 2005. Witness to revolution: the story of Anna Louise Strong. [Seattle, Wash.]: Ostrander Productions.

Primary Sources:
• Seattle. 2009. The Seattle general strike: an account of what happened in Seattle, and especially in the Seattle Labor Movement during the general strike, February 6 to 11, 1919. Seattle, Wash: Left Bank Books and Charlatan Stew.
Robert Friedheim Seattle General Strike Collection, Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
IWW Seattle Joint Branches Records, Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
Industrial Workers of the World photograph collection, Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
King County Central Labor Council Records, Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections
Broussais C. Beck papers, 1919-1961, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections

New episode of Labor Archives of Washington’s radio show on history of the 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike now streaming online

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show We Do the Work is now streaming online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange.

This ‘Learn Yourself’ will be about the pivotal 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike, which shut down ports along the West Coast for months, spurred a four-day general strike that shut down San Francisco,  and resulted in the emergence of regional leadership that would form the present day International Longshore and Warehouse Union. The strike also inspired workers for generations and reinvigorated other maritime unions, including the Sailors Union of the Pacific.

The regular segment, called “Learn Yourself”, features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections) being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. SeaTac Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign and History Project
  4. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  5. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  6. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll
  7. Author, Poet, Worker: Carlos Bulosan’s Collections at the Labor Archives of Washington and Eva Urcia’s Quest to Uncover and Preserve Bulosan Family History
  8. The Everett Massacre Centennial Commemoration
  9. The 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike

Marches, rallies & protests: collecting history as it happens

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The election of Donald J. Trump as the 45th President of the United States has catalyzed people both for and against him to rally, march and protest.

The University of Washington Libraries Special Collections is interested in collecting materials from these events – signs, flyers, digital photos and videos – all of which help us document this time in American history. We are interested in materials from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Alaska and British Columbia.

Since the election in November 2016 a number of protests and rallies have been held across the Pacific Northwest both for and against the new President and we are collecting materials from across the spectrum of support.  Whether you agree or disagree with the policies and have taken to the streets to make your voice heard, please get in touch and let us know if you have photos, videos, posters or flyers to donate.

As of this writing in February of 2017 additional marches, rallies and protests are being organized – we want materials from these events as well! There is little doubt that even more events will be organized in the coming years; we will be collecting these materials as well.

How to donate:

If you have signs, flyers, or other physical materials, please contact Anne Jenner, the Pacific Northwest Curator,  pnwcoll@uw.edu .

If you have digital photos or videos, contact Ann Lally, Digital Collections Curator, digcurat@uw.edu. If you are interested in donating digital items, here are a couple of guidelines:

  • prefer high resolution files from DSLR cameras, but will accept camera phone images
  • please review your images and weed out blurry or repetitive images

 

Ann Lally | Digital Collections Curator

 
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