New radio episodes: LELO and Intersectional Affirmative Action and Civil Rights Labor Organizing

 

The latest episodes of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show We Do the Work aired throughout October and at 91.7 FM KSVR (Mount Vernon, Washington) and are now streaming online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange.

The segment, the second part on the history and legacy of intersectional labor and civil rights organizing of the Northwest Labor Employment and Law Office, including the killing of two cannery worker union leaders in Seattle in 1981. This program features activists Cindy Domingo, Nemesio (Jr) Domingo and Garry Owens and Conor Casey, Labor Archivist for the Labor Archives of Washington.

Listen to the program:

https://exchange.prx.org/pieces/256810-cindy-and-nemesio-jr-domingo-and-garry-owens-le/floating_piece

Also airing We Do The Work: WXOJ (Florence, MA), KOWA (Olympia, WA), WRFI (Ithaca, NY), KIDE (Hoopa Tribe, CA), KVWV (Bellingham, WA), KBFG (Seattle, WA), KNSJ (San Diego, CA), KMRE (Bellingham), Work Force Rising, KCEI (Taos, NM), KODX (Seattle, WA), KGHI (Westport, Grays Harbor, WA), KPPQ (Ventura, CA), KVOY (Norman, OK), KBOG (Bandon, OR), WEFT (Champaign, IL), KRJF (Santa Rosa, CA), KWSI (Grand Junction, CO), and intermittently on KWRK (Fairbanks, AK or Window Rock, AZ), KVGD (Goldendale, WA), KZAX (Bellingham, WA), WRIR (Richmond, VA), KVRF (Palmer, AK), and WXDU (Durham, NC)

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. SeaTac Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign and History Project
  4. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  5. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  6. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll
  7. Author, Poet, Worker: Carlos Bulosan’s Collections at the Labor Archives of Washington and Eva Urcia’s Quest to Uncover and Preserve Bulosan Family History
  8. The Everett Massacre Centennial Commemoration
  9. The 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike
  10. The Seattle General Strike of 1919 and its Legacy
  11. Pablo O’Higgins, Chicano Student Activists, and the Ship Scalers’ Mural Conor Casey, Labor Archivist for the Labor Archives of Washington, Gigi Peterson, Author & Historian, Part 1
  12. Pablo O’Higgins, Chicano Student Activists, and the Ship Scalers’ Mural: Conor Casey, Labor Archivist for the Labor Archives of Washington, Gigi Peterson, Author & Historian, Part 2
  13. Conor Casey and Crystal Rodgers, archivists for the Labor Archives of Washington, Part 1 [Crystal Rodgers reports on LAW’s “Women in the Trades Exhibit”]

  14. Labor Journalist and Activist Anna Louise Strong
  15. Seattle labor unionist and labor, peace, feminist activist Irene Hull
  16.  “Tyree Scott, Minority Worker Activism in the Building Trades, and Tradeswomen Activism”
  17.  “The Centralia Tragedy”
  18. LELO and Intersectional Affirmative Action and Civil Rights Labor Organizing (Cindy Domingo, Nemesio Domingo Jr., and Garry Owens), Part 1
  19. LELO and Intersectional Affirmative Action and Civil Rights Labor Organizing (Cindy Domingo, Nemesio Domingo Jr., and Garry Owens), Part 2

 

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Lecture, Oct. 18, 2018 “The Erotic Importance of the Van Buskirk Diaries to the Histories of Art, Literature, and Sexuality”

Matthew KnipJoin us for a lecture by
Matthew Knip

October 18, 2018
3:00 – 4:30 pm
Allen Library Auditorium (ground floor Allen Library North)
University of Washington Suzzallo/Allen Libraries

The Erotic Importance of the Van Buskirk Diaries to the Histories of Art, Literature, and Sexuality

van buskirk imageMatthew Knip will discuss the importance of the Philip C. Van Buskirk diaries—housed in the Pacific Northwest Collection of the University of Washington Libraries Special Collection—to nineteenth century art, literary, and cultural criticism. Knip’s talk will scrutinize the homosocial and homoerotic subculture detailed in the diaries and outline the literary and artistic challenges this previously overlooked and misunderstood cultural world presents to a constellation of commonly-held critical assumptions about the nineteenth century, from authorship, privacy, and friendship to sexuality and identity.

 

Matthew Knip is a doctoral candidate in English at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and an adjunct instructor at Hunter College. His dissertation, Before Melville’s Masts: Sex in the Age of Sail, examines diverse sexual cultures Herman Melville experienced at sea and how these might inform the way we read his fiction. As a component of his research, he created a digital archive of the Philip C. Van Buskirk diaries from 1852 through 1858, including transcriptions of each entry. His essay “Homosocial Desire and Erotic Communitas in Melville’s Imaginary: The Evidence of Van Buskirk,” published in ESQ 62:2 (2016) won the 2017 Hennig Cohen Prize of the Melville Society for best article, book chapter, or essay on Herman Melville.

More about the significance of the Van Buskirk diaries

Between 1850 and 1903, Philip C. Van Buskirk composed more than three dozen volumes of a confessional diary that has the potential to powerfully reshape assumptions within art, literary, and cultural criticism of the nineteenth century. Historian B. R. Burg suggests the journals represent “the most extensive record of introspection ever kept by an American.” Van Buskirk recorded in his journals the everyday happenings that affected him personally. Less interested in the great political and military events that he witnessed firsthand—the Perry Expedition to Japan and the American Civil War, for instance—he outlined the moral and spiritual failings he identified in himself and others, with self-deprecating sincerity and confessional detail. By doing so, he quite unintentionally produced a remarkable, thick description of the homosocial organization of desire he (and Herman Melville) experienced among working-class sailors at sea. He opens a window into a previously overlooked and misunderstood world that existed before the emergence of modern sexuality, which interpellates subjects into identities that coalesce around object choice.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

PhilipVanBuskirkDiary_1852_endpaper

PhilipVanBuskirkDiary_1852

 

 

New episode of Labor Archives of Washington’s radio segment radio segment on Seattle labor, peace, feminist activist Irene Hull

 

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show We Do the Work is now streaming online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange.
Irene Hull (1913-2011) was a working woman, labor leader, communist, and a peace activist. A shipyard worker in World War II, Hull pushed for legislation to provide child care for working women. A lifelong labor activist, Hull was a sister in the Brotherhood of Bookbinders Local 87. She was a peace and anti-nuclear activist who co-founded the Seattle chapter of the Coalition of Labor Union Women (CLUW) in 1973 and the Seattle chapter of Jobs With Justice (JWJ) in the 1980s. Her service to the labor movement of Washington State was legendary and she was honored by both the King County Labor Council and the Washington State Labor Council, which gave her its Lifetime Achievement Award at its 2002 convention. Hull was recipient of the 2008 Mother Jones Award. Seattle Mayor Norm Rice, the city’s first African American mayor, proclaimed Sept. 7, 1996 “Irene Hull Day.”

The regular segment, called “Learn Yourself”, features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections) being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series [Listen here: https://beta.prx.org/series/33458%5D:

 

The regular segment, called “Learn Yourself”, features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections) being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. SeaTac Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign and History Project
  4. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  5. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  6. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll
  7. Author, Poet, Worker: Carlos Bulosan’s Collections at the Labor Archives of Washington and Eva Urcia’s Quest to Uncover and Preserve Bulosan Family History
  8. The Everett Massacre Centennial Commemoration
  9. The 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike
  10. The Seattle General Strike of 1919 and its Legacy
  11. Pablo O’Higgins, Chicano Student Activists, and the Ship Scalers’ Mural Conor Casey, Labor Archivist for the Labor Archives of Washington, Gigi Peterson, Author & Historian, Part 1
  12. Pablo O’Higgins, Chicano Student Activists, and the Ship Scalers’ Mural: Conor Casey, Labor Archivist for the Labor Archives of Washington, Gigi Peterson, Author & Historian, Part 2
  13. Conor Casey and Crystal Rodgers, archivists for the Labor Archives of Washington, Part 1 [Crystal Rodgers reports on LAW’s “Women in the Trades Exhibit”]

  14. Labor Journalist and Activist Anna Louise Strong
  15. Seattle labor unionist and labor, peace, feminist activist Irene Hull

For more information, click on the following links:


 

 

Primary Source Collections

Irene B. Hull papers, 1933-2006. Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collection. http://archiveswest.orbiscascade.org/ark:/80444/xv45401/op=fstyle.aspx?t=k&q=WAUHullIreneB3783.xml

Hull, Irene. “Irene Hull Oral History,” Communism in Washington State History and Memory Project

http://depts.washington.edu/labhist/cpproject/hull_interview.shtml

Newspaper Articles

Seattle Times “Irene Hull: 60-plus years of avid political activism”  http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=20010705&slug=irenehull05m

Obituaries

Seattle Times “Irene Hull, longtime labor-rights advocate, dies at 98”

www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/irene-hull-longtime-labor-rights-advocate-dies-at-98/

People’s Daily World. “Labor stalwart Irene Hull dies at 98”

http://www.peoplesworld.org/article/labor-stalwart-irene-hull-dies-at-9/

New episode of Labor Archives of Washington’s radio segment on journalist and activist Anna Louise Strong

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show We Do the Work is now streaming online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange.

This ‘Learn Yourself’ will focus on Anna Louise Strong, a 20th-century American journalist, activist, and supporter of the labor movement who participated in the Seattle General Strike of 1919. Strong’s papers are one of the highlights of the University of Washington Libraries Special Collections.

The regular segment, called “Learn Yourself”, features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections) being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. SeaTac Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign and History Project
  4. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  5. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  6. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll
  7. Author, Poet, Worker: Carlos Bulosan’s Collections at the Labor Archives of Washington and Eva Urcia’s Quest to Uncover and Preserve Bulosan Family History
  8. The Everett Massacre Centennial Commemoration
  9. The 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike
  10. The Seattle General Strike of 1919 and its Legacy
  11. Pablo O’Higgins, Chicano Student Activists, and the Ship Scalers’ Mural Conor Casey, Labor Archivist for the Labor Archives of Washington, Gigi Peterson, Author & Historian, Part 1
  12. Pablo O’Higgins, Chicano Student Activists, and the Ship Scalers’ Mural: Conor Casey, Labor Archivist for the Labor Archives of Washington, Gigi Peterson, Author & Historian, Part 2
  13. Conor Casey and Crystal Rodgers, archivists for the Labor Archives of Washington, Part 1 [Crystal Rodgers reports on LAW’s “Women in the Trades Exhibit”]

  14. Labor Journalist and Activist Anna Louise Strong

For more information, click on the following links:

Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections

Anna Louise Strong Papers, 1885 1971. 24.11 cubic feet (43 boxes, 3 packages, 3 folders). 14 microfilm reels. http://lib.washington.edu/specialcollections/laws Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington].

University of Washington Libraries Special Collections

Strong Family Papers. 1832–1994. 1.46 linear feet. http://digital.lib.washington.edu/findingaids/view?docId=Strongfamily0958.xml

Sydney Strong Papers. 1860–1938. 5.75 linear feet plus 4 ephemeral items. Contains material collected by Sydney Strong about his daughter, Anna Louise. http://digital.lib.washington.edu/findingaids/view?docId=StrongSydney0959.xml

Clayton Van Lydegraf Papers.1944–1991. 46.74 linear feet, including 2 sound cassettes. Contains correspondence between Van Lydegraf and Strong from 1967–1970. http://digital.lib.washington.edu/findingaids/view?docId=VanLydegrafClayton1341.xml            

Digital Archives of Primary Sources

Labor Archives Portal of the UW Libraries Digital Collections contains hundreds of letter and writings by Strong and correspondence between her and family members. We digitized it several years ago. http://content.lib.washington.edu/portals/law/index.html

Anna Louise Strong Archive at marxists.org  https://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/strong-anna-louise/index.htm

Autobiography

(1935). I Change Worlds: the Remaking of an American. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston

Secondary Sources:

Andrews, Mildred. “Strong, Anna Louise (1885-1970)” HistoryLink.org  http://www.historylink.org/File/255

“Witness to Revolution: The Story of Anna Louise Strong” https://www.kanopystreaming.com/product/witness-revolution

Jackson, Rebecca, “The Politics of Gender in the Writings of Anna Louise Strong,” Seattle General Strike Project, 1999. http://depts.washington.edu/labhist/strike/jackson.shtml

O’Connor, Harvey. “Revolution in Seattle: A Memoir” (Monthly Review Press, 1964; Haymarket Books, 2009)

Strong, Tracy B. and Helene Keysser, “Right in Her Soul: The Life of Anna Louise Strong” (Random House, 1983)

Primary Source Collections

Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections

Irene B. Hull papers, 1933-2006. Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collection. archiveswest.orbiscascade.org/ark:/80444/xv45401/op=fstyle.aspx?t=k&q=WAUHullIreneB3783.xml

Hull, Irene. “Irene Hull Oral History,” Communism in Washington State History and Memory Project

http://depts.washington.edu/labhist/cpproject/hull_interview.shtml

Newspaper Articles

Seattle Times “Irene Hull: 60-plus years of avid political activism”  http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=20010705&slug=irenehull05m

Obituaries

Seattle Times “Irene Hull, longtime labor-rights advocate, dies at 98”

www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/irene-hull-longtime-labor-rights-advocate-dies-at-98/

People’s Daily World. “Labor stalwart Irene Hull dies at 98”

http://www.peoplesworld.org/article/labor-stalwart-irene-hull-dies-at-9/

New episode of Labor Archives of Washington’s radio show on women’s labor history, “Women in the Trades” exhibit

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show We Do the Work is now streaming online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange.

This ‘Learn Yourself’ will be about the women’s labor history, woman workers and leaders. In this segment, special guest Assistant Labor Archivist Crystal Rodgers reports back about a pop-up exhibit she curated on “Women in the Trades”, employing LAW’s collections relating to working women in the building trades.

Special guest Crystal Rogers, assistant archivist for the Labor Archives of Washington, Part 1 [Crystal Rodgers reports on LAW’s “Women in the Trades Exhibit”]

The regular segment, called “Learn Yourself”, features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections) being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. SeaTac Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign and History Project
  4. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  5. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  6. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll
  7. Author, Poet, Worker: Carlos Bulosan’s Collections at the Labor Archives of Washington and Eva Urcia’s Quest to Uncover and Preserve Bulosan Family History
  8. The Everett Massacre Centennial Commemoration
  9. The 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike
  10. The Seattle General Strike of 1919 and its Legacy
  11. Pablo O’Higgins, Chicano Student Activists, and the Ship Scalers’ Mural Conor Casey, Labor Archivist for the Labor Archives of Washington, Gigi Peterson, Author & Historian, Part 1
  12. Pablo O’Higgins, Chicano Student Activists, and the Ship Scalers’ Mural: Conor Casey, Labor Archivist for the Labor Archives of Washington, Gigi Peterson, Author & Historian, Part 2
  13. Conor Casey and Crystal Rodgers, archivists for the Labor Archives of Washington, Part 1 [Crystal Rodgers reports on LAW’s “Women in the Trades Exhibit”]

New Digital Collection: The Richard V. Correll prints and papers

 

Richard_V_Correll_in_studio_1953 (1)
Richard Correll in his studio painting Paul Bunyan, a part of a series of paintings created for the Federal Art Project of the WPA, ca. 1938-1940.

The Labor Archives of Washington is excited to announce that the prints and papers of famous West Coast artist, Richard V. Correll, are now viewable (almost) in its entirety, on the UW Libraries Digital Collections site! Consisting primarily of original artwork created by Correll, including a variety of prints, original drawings, and paintings, the collection contains nearly the full body of his work! This collection truly demonstrates the expansiveness of his artistry both in technique and subject matter, encompassing themes of working people, civil rights, and social justice as well as nature scenes, figure drawings, Paul Bunyan, and a scrapbook of holiday cards spanning over 39 years.

 

Fire_Hose.jpg
Fire Hose/Fight Back, 1971 (linocut print)
size
“No Wars For Big Oil”, 1979 

In 2012-2013, the Labor Archives spotlighted Correll’s work in the exhibit, Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Art of Richard V. Correll. You can now view a digital version of this exhibit as well as access a web portal to the full digital collection on the Labor Archives of Washington’s Digital Resources Guide. (We even have a portable version of the physical exhibit, enabling us to take Images of Labor and Social Justice on the road!)

laborarchivists_wslc-convention
Our portable Correll exhibit on display at the WA State Labor Council Convention in July 2017! (Feat. Labor Archivist, Conor Casey, and Assistant Labor Archivist, Crystal Rodgers)

The collection also includes several sketchbooks and audio recordings of an oral history interview with Correll from 1979, to be digitized, as well as books and a small series of paper ephemera, photographs, and other published material about Correll’s life and artwork. Three cd-roms donated to us with the collection contain photographs of Correll as well as additional digital photographs of his prints and illustrations. Want to learn more about the collection in its entirety? Check out the online finding aid on Archives West!

Divers_1986
Divers, 1986 (woodcut/collage print)

And if you’d like more background information about this prolific artist, Labor Archivist Conor Casey talks about Correll’s life and work in the May 2013 interview on KUOW and KBCS during the Northwest Folklife Festival as well as July 2016’s “Learn Yourself”, a segment of KSVR Studio’s We Do The Work radio show. Seattle’s weekly publication, the Stranger, also spotlighted the collection in an article published in February 2013!

For any specific questions about the Correll prints and papers or other labor collections at the LAW, contact Labor Archivist Conor Casey! Interested more generally in conducting research at the UW Libraries Special Collections? View our website for more information about hours and how to prepare for your visit!

“Past Forward”: Labor Archives latest exhibit on display at the LERC!

rachel-exhibit

The exhibit I curated for the Harry Bridges Labor Center for Labor Studies and the Washington State Labor Education and Research Center partnership is titled Past Forward: Snapshots of Social Justice Labor Organizing and looks at ten moments throughout the history of labor organizing in the Pacific Northwest. Organized around four progressive issues, the exhibit covers a wide range of both organized labor and labor activists’ social justice victories. To gather the stories that are told in the exhibit, I explored collections suggested by Conor Casey, the Labor Archivist and Director of Labor Archives of Washington, UW Libraries Special Collections; spoke with other labor researchers at the UW; and read up on labor history in our area using resources such as the Seattle Civil Rights & Labor History Project. The exhibit drew heavily on the collections of the Labor Archives. There are so many interesting stories to be told, and I was very excited to be able to highlight one of the earliest multicultural coalitions which fought the anti-miscegenation laws introduced in our state in the 1930s as wells as to bring the exhibit all the way to this year by including the Seattle Womxn’s March in January. Researching, curating, and writing this exhibit has contributed to my education, and it has been truly inspiring to learn about and re-visit the struggles of labor activists around race, gender, wage, and international human rights here in our region. rachel exhibit 3

– Post by Student Curator, Rachel Townsend

You can view the exhibit at the Washington State Labor Education and Research Center, located on the South Seattle College Georgetown campus (6737 Corson Ave. S, Building B, outside of Room 106).