Save the Date: “Past Forward: The Legacy of Left Coast Militant Unionism and Lessons For Today’s Struggles” Reception and Labor Archives of Washington Annual Event

Labor Archives Event 2017 poster draft (002)

SAVE THE DATE!

“Past Forward: The Legacy of Left Coast Militant Unionism and Lessons For Today’s Struggles”

Reception and Labor Archives of Washington Annual Event

Free Event

5:30-7:30 PM, June 24, 2017

Mary Gates Hall, University of Washington Seattle Campus

An evening devoted to the dramatic and powerful labor history of the West Coast waterfront, the importance of preserving that history, and the inspiration it can provide us in our present political moment. This three-part program features segments with labor archivists, ILWU activists, and political scientists putting the history and present into perspective.

Part 1: Labor Archives History Panel

“Under the Hook, in the Hall, on the March, and upon the Shelves: ILWU-Related Collections at Pacific Coast Labor Archives”

Presenters:

  •          Robin Walker, Librarian and Archivist,    ILWU Library and Archives
  •          Catherine Powell, Director, Labor Archives and Research Center, SFSU
  •          Conor Casey, Labor Archivist/Director, Labor Archives of Washington, UW

In this panel, labor archivists will talk about the ILWU’s rich and often colorful history preserved in archives in California, Oregon, Washington, and Hawaii.

Featuring the directors of three labor archives — the Labor Archives and Research Center at San Francisco State University, the Labor Archives of Washington at the University of Washington, Seattle; and the Anne Rand Library at the International Longshore and Warehouse Union in San Francisco — this panel will discuss the ways in which unions, universities, scholars, and activists have worked together to preserve and promote the legacy of the left coast maritime labor movement.  The presentations will highlight collections from this history, which relate directly to today’s struggles for workers’ rights, immigrant rights, social justice, civil rights, and other causes. Topics will include the Harry Bridges Deportation trials, the deportation and defense of progressive Filipino American cannery union officers and members, and other episodes in the union’s long history of activism.

Part 2: ILWU Activists Panel

“How History Informs Current Struggles”

Presenters:

  •          Rich Austin, Jr., President of ILWU, Local 19
  •          Dean McGrath, President of ILWU , Local 23
  •          Terri Mast, National Secretary Treasurer Inlandboatmen’s Union of the Pacific
  •          George Lovell, Harry Bridges Center Chair (Moderator)

ILWU officers consider how the militant history and guiding principles of the union relate directly to today’s struggles and how those lessons can help suggest a path for current and future efforts.

Part 3: “The Legacy of ILWU Activism in the Current Political Context”

 

  • Michael McCann, Harry Bridges Center Director

Professor of Political Science and Harry Bridges Center Director Michael McCann will consider the history of the ILWU and social justice unionism on the Pacific Coast with issues such as immigration, civil rights, and social justice history and current struggles within the current political context. What lessons from the ILWU’s history inform current can and future actions?  
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Help document May 1 marches, strikes, and actions by donating photos, video, signs

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The UW Libraries Special Collections and its Labor Archives of Washington are documenting and collecting items from the upcoming May 1, 2017, marches in the Puget Sound region.

We are interested in your:

Photographs and video of signs and crowd scenes. High-resolution files from DSLR cameras are preferred, but they will accept camera phone images. Please review your images and edit out blurry or repetitive images. To make submissions, Email Conor Casey, Labor Archivist, and in the email:

  • In the email title or text, note that submissions are for a labor or labor-related organization and name the organization/banner you marched behind
  • That they are destined for the Labor Archives of Washington’s digital collections.

Labor-related physical signs and flyers used in the march. Email Conor Casey, UW Libraries Labor Archivist Conor Casey, to arrange for delivery pickup of your items.

You will be required to sign a donor form for any materials given to the UW Libraries. This form allows future researchers to use your images or materials in books, documentaries, etc. If you have questions about the donor form or copyright, email Conor Casey.

For general questions, Email Conor Casey, .

New episode of Labor Archives of Washington’s radio show on history of the 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike now streaming online

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show We Do the Work is now streaming online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange.

This ‘Learn Yourself’ will be about the pivotal 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike, which shut down ports along the West Coast for months, spurred a four-day general strike that shut down San Francisco,  and resulted in the emergence of regional leadership that would form the present day International Longshore and Warehouse Union. The strike also inspired workers for generations and reinvigorated other maritime unions, including the Sailors Union of the Pacific.

The regular segment, called “Learn Yourself”, features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections) being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. SeaTac Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign and History Project
  4. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  5. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  6. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll
  7. Author, Poet, Worker: Carlos Bulosan’s Collections at the Labor Archives of Washington and Eva Urcia’s Quest to Uncover and Preserve Bulosan Family History
  8. The Everett Massacre Centennial Commemoration
  9. The 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike

Labor Archives of Washington’s New Television Segment Airs This Weekend on KOMO TV (Seattle), Streams online Thereafter

banner-testThe Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections,  is pleased to announce the first episode of our new segment on the news magazine show UW360. The multi-episode segment will highlight the UW Libraries, Special Collections, and the Labor Archives’ collections, researchers, and community supporters. The segment will air on KOMO TV on Sunday, October 2 at 5:30 PM and stream on various media platforms including YouTube, Roku and Amazon Fire TV, thereafter. The rest of the episodes of the series are in production and will air over the next year.
Here’s the direct link to the Labor Archives segment: http://uwtv.org/series/uw360/watch/kfs6VK-HpS4/
Here’s the link to the entire episode:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4hNwH4Untc

National History Day Students Win 2016 Regional Video Contest Employing Labor Archives of Washington Collections and Staff Interviews

Every year,  Special Collections and the Labor Archives of Washington works with National History Day students on their projects. This year, students Ashley Luty, Ananya Jain, and Eileen Zhang placed 1st in Washington State for the Junior Group Documentary category for their film “A Wave of Change: The 1934 West Coast Waterfront Strike.” The documentary employed the Labor Archives’ collections and included interviews with LAW Labor Archivist Conor Casey.

This wasn’t the first award-winning National History Day film to win: in 2013, student Heni Barnes won the National Competition with her film “Striking A Turning Point: The 1917 Pacific Northwest Lumber Strike”, which included Labor Archives collections and interviews with LAW staff as well.

New episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s radio segment on Filipino American author, poet, labor activist Carlos Bulosan streaming online

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show We Do the Work is now streaming online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange.

The interview will be with Conor Casey, Labor Archivist at the Labor Archives of Washington, and Evangeline Urcia, great-grandniece of Carlos Bulosan. This ‘Learn Yourself’ will be about the life of Carlos Bulosan, a Filipino American activist, poet, writer, and worker. For more information, go to www.laborarchives.org or email cmcasey@uw.edu

The regular segment, called “Learn Yourself”, features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections) being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  4. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  5. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll
  6. Author, Poet, Worker: Carlos Bulosan’s Collections at the Labor Archives of Washington and Eva Urcia’s Quest to Uncover and Preserve Bulosan Family History
  7. The Everett Massacre Centennial Commemoration
  8. The 1934 Pacific Coast Maritime Strike

New episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s radio segment now streaming online

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show We Do the Work is now steaming online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange.

This episode examines the life and work of Richard V. Correll (1904-1990), who was featured in several Labor Archives exhibits in 201–at UW Special Collections, Northwest Folklife, and the Pacific Northwest Labor History Association Conference–will be the subject of an upcoming ongoing online exhibit now that the entire collection has been digitized.

Correll, whose prints and papers were donated to the Labor Archives in 2011, was “one of the leading masters of printmaking in the West.” Best known for his powerful black and white linoleum cuts, etchings and woodblock prints, for most of his life he earned a living as a commercial artist in the book publishing and advertising fields while producing a large body of fine art in his own time.

Correll’s themes ranged from landscapes, animals and agricultural scenes, harbors and ships, and music and dance to those which reflected his lifelong concern with political and social issues. Correll’s work spanned decades and prominently featured images of labor, social justice, civil rights, anti-war themes, work for the Great Depression-era Federal Art Project of the Works Projects Administration, and his work for the progressive Depression-era newspaper the Voice of Action.

The regular segment, called “Learn Yourself”, features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections) being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  4. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  5. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll