National History Day Students Win 2016 Regional Video Contest Employing Labor Archives of Washington Collections and Staff Interviews

Every year,  Special Collections and the Labor Archives of Washington works with National History Day students on their projects. This year, students Ashley Luty, Ananya Jain, and Eileen Zhang placed 1st in Washington State for the Junior Group Documentary category for their film “A Wave of Change: The 1934 West Coast Waterfront Strike.” The documentary employed the Labor Archives’ collections and included interviews with LAW Labor Archivist Conor Casey.

This wasn’t the first award-winning National History Day film to win: in 2013, student Heni Barnes won the National Competition with her film “Striking A Turning Point: The 1917 Pacific Northwest Lumber Strike”, which included Labor Archives collections and interviews with LAW staff as well.

New episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s radio segment on Carlos Bulosan airs August 23, streaming online thereafter

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show We Do the Work is now steaming online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange will air Tuesday, August 23, 6:30 pm on 91.7 FM.

The interview will be with Conor Casey, Labor Archivist at the Labor Archives of Washington, and Evangeline Urcia, great-grandniece of Carlos Bulosan. This ‘Learn Yourself’ will be about the life of Carlos Bulosan, a Filipino American activist, poet, writer, and worker. For more information, go to www.laborarchives.org or email cmcasey@uw.edu

The regular segment, called “Learn Yourself”, features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections) being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  4. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  5. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll

À la Carte ~ Crowdsourcing historic PNW menus ~ We need you!

How did restaurants handle the coffee shortage during WWII?
When did the beverage sauerkraut juice disappear from menus?
What was the price of caviar in 1911?

These are some of the questions we need your help to answer!

The University of Washington Libraries Special Collections has launched À la Carte, a project to crowdsource the transcription of the data contained in our historic menu collection.   Special Collections holds more than 700 menus from Seattle and the Pacific Northwest of interest to historians, economists, chefs, scientists, and everyday food enthusiasts.  The trouble is, the menus are very hard to search for the greatest treasures they contain: specific information about dishes, prices, and all the stories they tell about food history and culture.

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To aid in the discovery of these tasty tidbits of history, we’re working to improve the description of the menus in the collection by transcribing the menus, dish by dish.  Doing this will dramatically expand the ways the collection can be researched and accessed.  We built a website that will make this big job pretty easy to do.  This is where you and your friends, who also love food, become part of this crowdsourcing effort.  We depend on you (the crowd) to visit the website, look at a menu, and using the tools on the website, tell us what you see on that menu.  Dishes, prices, menu section, ingredients, and geographical location are the types of information you will be helping us uncover.

Interested? Contact info@uwmenus.org or visit the project website to complete the contact form. We’ll email you with further information about the project and optional summer meet up opportunities.

Don’t miss your chance to take part in this exciting new UW project!

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Project staff:
Anne Jenner, Pacific Northwest Curator
Ann Lally, Digital Curator
Sarah L. Ketchley, Digital Humanities

 

New episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s radio segment now streaming online

The latest episode of the Labor Archives of Washington’s regular segment on the KSVR radio show We Do the Work is now steaming online via KSVR and Public Radio International’s Exchange.

This episode examines the life and work of Richard V. Correll (1904-1990), who was featured in several Labor Archives exhibits in 201–at UW Special Collections, Northwest Folklife, and the Pacific Northwest Labor History Association Conference–will be the subject of an upcoming ongoing online exhibit now that the entire collection has been digitized.

Correll, whose prints and papers were donated to the Labor Archives in 2011, was “one of the leading masters of printmaking in the West.” Best known for his powerful black and white linoleum cuts, etchings and woodblock prints, for most of his life he earned a living as a commercial artist in the book publishing and advertising fields while producing a large body of fine art in his own time.

Correll’s themes ranged from landscapes, animals and agricultural scenes, harbors and ships, and music and dance to those which reflected his lifelong concern with political and social issues. Correll’s work spanned decades and prominently featured images of labor, social justice, civil rights, anti-war themes, work for the Great Depression-era Federal Art Project of the Works Projects Administration, and his work for the progressive Depression-era newspaper the Voice of Action.

The regular segment, called “Learn Yourself”, features Labor Archivist Conor Casey (Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections) being interviewed about a history topic by host Mike Dumovich with an emphasis on archival collections and secondary sources related to the topic in the hopes that it will inspire people to learn more about labor history on their own.

Links to Other Episodes in the Series:

  1. Labor Archives of Washington Overview
  2. Everett Massacre, also called Bloody Sunday, where a confrontation caused 7 to 12 people to be murdered on November 5, 1916.
  3. Filipino American Cannery Workers’ Unionism and the Murder of Domingo and Viernes
  4. Farmworkers’ History: The Chateau St. Michelle Grape Boycott and the Labor Archives of Washington’s second annual event Preserving Solidarity Forever: Washington State Farmworkers’ Struggles.
  5. Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Life and Art of Richard V. Correll

 

 

 

 

 

Finding Aids Moving to Archives West

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This spring, Special Collections will transition its findings aids from our locally-hosted XTF site to Archives West, formerly known as Northwest Digital Archives.

Archives West, a program offering of the Orbis Cascade Alliance since 2007, provides access to descriptions of primary sources in the western United States, including correspondence, diaries or photographs. Institutions in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Alaska, Montana, and Utah have loaded descriptions (finding aids) of their collections to Archives West.  In some cases, digital reproductions of the materials are linked directly from the finding aids.

A finding aid is a detailed guide or inventory of the contents of a manuscript or archival collection. The guide provides a gateway to the collection because it allows researchers to identify the boxes or folders they will need for their research. A typical guide also provide biographical or historical information on the person or organization that created the material, an overview of the collection, and how it is arranged plus a detailed container list and any use restrictions.

What will Archives West add to the user experience?

  • It provides access to all of our finding aids.  Our old site is no longer being updated, so use Archives West to find the most current descriptions of our collections.
  • It allows searches across regional repositories. You are likely to find related collections held by other repositories in the Northwest.
  • It creates an updated search environment that will more readily display digitized content and enhance our collection descriptions with more search terms.

What can you expect in the coming months?

  • We invite our researchers to try the new site now.
  • A cut-off date for the current XTF site this summer (date to be announced).

Take the Archives West User Survey to win an Amazon gift card!

Archives West is conducting a two-part assessment of the recent redesign until April 15, 2016. They are looking for people who use Archives West to fill out a survey and to potentially answer some follow-up questions on how successful the redesign of the site is. If you are interested in being part of this effort, please go to https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LFVBR6B. A  few individuals will be selected for follow-up questions – those selected will receive $10 Amazon.com gift cards.

 

 

Labor Archives of Washington Launches web archives on SeaTac/Seattle Minimum Wage Campaigns

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This Thursday, March 3, the will mark the official launch of a new web archives documenting the historic $15 an hour minimum wage campaigns in SeaTac and Seattle in 2013-2014.

The project, a collaboration between the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies and the Labor Archives of Washington at the University of Washington Libraries’ Special Collections,  focuses on the SeaTac and Seattle victories, ensuring that scholars, activists, journalists, and students can learn from the minimum wage campaigns well into the future. The SeaTac/Seattle Minimum Wage History Project  is a digital repository of close to oral history interviews (videos, audio, and transcriptions) with key players, along with rally signs and campaign website captures. New sections of analytical essays, a timeline of wage increases nationwide, and other interview and digitized records will join the archives over time.

Guest blogger Conor Casey, Labor Archivist
UW Special Collections, Labor Archives of Washington

Pioneering Medicine

John McLoughlin. Marcus Whitman. David Maynard.

What do these three men have in common? In addition to being pioneer settlers of the Oregon Territory all three were also physicians. From the days of its earliest exploration, the Pacific Northwest has been shaped by pioneering physicians. The original culture of enterprise continues to this day as local physicians continue to make groundbreaking discoveries.

By the time the Denny party landed at Alki Point in West Seattle on November 13, 1851, physicians had already been active in the Pacific Northwest for years. John McLoughlin first arrived in Vancouver in 1824 as Superintendent of the Columbia District, establishing fur trade and overseeing operations of the Hudson Bay Company. Marcus Whitman founded the Whitman Mission near Walla Walla in 1843 and his treatment of Native Americans contributed to his eventual death at the hands of Cayuse Indians in 1847, along with his wife Narcissa and eleven others.

maynardUniversity of Washington Libraries. Special Collections. Photo Collection 563.

David Maynard, better known as ‘Doc’, traveled across the Oregon Trail originally settling in Olympia. In April of 1852 he laid claim to a section of 640 acres and moved his general store north at the behest of Seattle, chief of the Duwamish tribe, where he became the first physician to practice medicine in the burgeoning city. Because of his strong relationships with area tribes, Maynard put forth the name of Seattle for the young settlement, successfully convincing his fellow settlers it was a better choice over its original name Duwamps. This was the first of many innovations attributed to Maynard.

 

Maynard’s accomplishments have become both embellished and diminished by time as the result of Bill Speidel’s ‘never let the facts get in the way of a good story’ approach to history and Maynard’s early death in 1873 when Seattle was still getting its footing. Consequently, Maynard’s legacy was left to be told by the other members of the Denny party — conservative and teetotaling, two things Maynard was not — and, as a result, his name slipped from the early historical accounts of Seattle.

Yet Maynard has a long list of firsts attached to his name including the founding of the

maynard_1863The Seattle Gazette (Seattle, Washington Territory), 10 December 1863, pg. 2.

Seattle’s first hospital. The two-room facility, in what is now Pioneer Square, failed because white settlers refused to use the hospital after Maynard insisted on serving Indians, as well. Maynard was also the first Indian agent — appointed by Governor Isaac Stevens — because of his good relations with the local tribes. At various times Maynard served as a notary public, clerk of the court and school superintendent, in addition to platting one of the first maps of Seattle on May 23, 1853. He was admitted to the bar in 1856 after the only lawyer in town drowned. He also served as a Justice of the Peace, marrying early settlers David Denny and Louisa Boren — the first marriage in King County — on January 23, 1853.

Maynard’s generosity was also his downfall and he made and lost several fortunes during Seattle’s early years. Pacific Northwest historian Thomas Prosch described him as “a man of marked individuality and richly endowed with good qualities. No one could be more liberal and kind than he” in his biography of Maynard.

Maynard’s story is just one of those featured in an exhibit, Pioneering Medicine: Milestones from Seattle’s First Century 1850-1950, currently on display in Special Collections at the University of Washington. Like Maynard, many of the physicians were also civic leaders, organizers and elected officials involved with many aspects of establishing Seattle as a city to rival any in America. Join us for two gallery walks scheduled for anyone interested in hearing more about some of Seattle’s early physicians and their contributions:

  • Wed, January 27, 9-10am
  • Thu, February 4, 4-5pm

All are welcome!

Guest blogger Lisa Oberg, Special Collections