Courage in Action – Day of Remembrance Symposium on Gordon Hirabayashi

20 02 2014

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Join us for the 2014 Day of Remembrance, Saturday, February 22, 2014 to honor the life and legacy of civil rights icon Gordon K. Hirabayashi.  The symposium (free and open to the public) from 1:00 to 5:00 in Kane Hall on the UW campus will feature lectures, performances and remembrances by the Hirabayashi family, and the presentation of Hirabayashi’s Presidential Medal of Freedom, awarded posthumously to Hirabayashi by President Obama in 2012.

The medal will be part of the Gordon K. Hirabayashi papers in Special Collections.  His journals, photographs, letters and legal papers were donated last year by his family and many items are on display in the Allen Library North Lobby in an exhibit titled “Civil Disobedience!”  The exhibit ends February 28.

There also will be book-signing in Kane Hall’s Walker Ames Room from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. by Lane Hirabayashi, co-author of the 2013 University of Washington Press book “A Principled Stand: The Story of Gordon Hirabayashi.”

In a related event, a play by about Hirabayashi titled “Hold These Truths,” by Jeanne Sakata, featuring actor Greg Watanabe, will be given a staged reading at Theater Off Jackson, Feb. 22 and 23.





Exhibit on Gordon Hirabayashi

5 02 2014

Civil Disobedience!
The Life and Legacy of Gordon K. Hirabayashi

Exhibit from University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections, Pacific Northwest Collection

Date: February 3 through 28, 2014

Allen Library North Lobby

1940_GKH_Portraitcropped       2012 hirabayashi-medal-1

During World War II, 24 year-old University of Washington student Gordon Hirabayashi defied the United States order for Americans of Japanese ancestry to leave the West Coast for concentration camps.  He turned himself in to the FBI and was tried and convicted in the Federal District Court of Seattle. The case ultimately went to the Supreme Court where it was upheld.  After the war, Hirabayashi completed a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Washington, and went on to teach at American University in Beirut, American University in Cairo, and at the University of Alberta in Canada.

It was some 40 years later that Gordon Hirabayashi’s wartime conviction was overturned in an extraordinary case that exposed the suppression and alteration of evidence by the government.  Gordon’s principled stand to uphold the Constitution for all Americans is a legacy to be preserved. The story has  been documented in dozens of academic publications, documentaries, and theater productions.  Gordon dedicated his life to keeping the story of the injustice of Japanese American incarceration alive.  In May of 2012, five months after his death, he posthumously received the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

In 2013, the personal papers of Gordon Hirabayashi were donated to the Pacific Northwest Collection of the University of Washington Libraries Special Collections.  They join a growing collection of papers, oral histories, and photographs that help document the Japanese American experience in the Pacific Northwest.  This exhibit features items from his papers, including his prison diaries and photographs documenting his life.   The Gordon K. Hirabayashi Papers will be open for research  on February 24, 2014 in Special Collections.

Items from other collections featured in the exhibit are:

The Ring Family Papers, Acc. 4241, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections.  Many letters from this collection are digitized and available online.

The S. Frank Miyamoto Collection, Acc. 2485, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections

Other Events:

The exhibit is in coordination with the upcoming symposium entitled Courage in Action:  A Symposium on the Life and Legacy of Gordon K. Hirabayashi,  for 2014 Day of Remembrance, February 22, 2014.  More information online here.

Hold These Truths, a play by Jeanne Sakata. Solo staged reading at Theatre off Jackson, concurrent with the SPF 8 Solo Performance Festival. Feb. 22 at 7:30 p.m. and Feb. 23 at 2 p.m. $15 general admission/$10 seniors and students.
Tickets and information available here.





Richard Wagener Lecture and Related Exhibits in Special Collections

20 03 2013

The Book Arts Guild and University of Washington Libraries present

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An Afternoon at Mithras Bookstore and a Sierra Journey, a lecture by Richard Wagener.  This talk will trace his development as a wood engraver and his involvement in the world of fine press books.

Thursday April 11, 2013, 7-9pm (doors open at 6:45)
Maps/Special Collections Classroom
Suzzallo Library Basement Room B69

Richard Wagener grew up in southern California spending a lot of time with his grandfather in remote parts of the desert and up in the Sierra. Early art classes introduced him to Maynard Dixon and Edgar Payne. After school activities included selling the evening newspapers at the Disney studios where he met many of the illustrators and animators. Richard has an undergraduate degree from the University of San Diego and a graduate degree from Art Center College of Design. He has been engraving wood for over thirty years and his work has been in a number of fine press editions. He currently lives and works in northern California.

There are two related exhibitions that feature relief printing which are on display in Special Collections.  This will be an opportunity to view them.  Both Conor Casey, curator of Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Art of Richard V. Correll and Sandra Kroupa curator of Lasting Impressions: Relief Prints Over 500 Years, will speak briefly and will provide access to the exhibitions.





New Exhibit-Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Art of Richard V. Correll

6 12 2012

Images of Labor and Social Justice: The Art of Richard V. Correll

New Additions to the Collection of the Labor Archives of Washington State, UW Special Collections

December 6, 2012 – April 19, 2013
Special Collections Basement Lobby
Allen Library North First Floor Balcony

Richard V. (Dick) Correll (1904-1990), was “one of the leading masters of printmaking in the West.” Best known for his powerful black and white linoleum cuts, etchings and woodblock prints, for most of his life he earned a living as a commercial artist in the book publishing and advertising fields while producing a large body of fine art in his own time.
Correll’s themes ranged from landscapes, animals and agricultural scenes, harbors and ships, and music and dance to those which reflected his lifelong concern with political and social issues. This exhibit features selections from several core areas of Correll’s recently donated collection at the Labor Archives of Washington, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections: Images of labor, social justice, civil rights, anti-war themes, work for the Great Depression-era Federal Art Project of the Works Projects Administration, and his work for the progressive Depression-era newspaper the Voice of Action.





The World of Tomorrow Continues

31 08 2012

Image of the Space Needle at night taken during the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair by an unknown photographer

As the long weekend approaches and the end of the season draws ever closer, why not try to prolong that summertime feeling for at least a little while longer by planning a visit to The World of Tomorrow: Looking Back at the Seattle Worlds Fair next week? The exhibit, which celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Century 21 exposition, has been extended through September 14, 2012.

You will find the exhibit installed in cases on the Allen Library North balcony and the Special Collections lobby. Both areas are accessible to the public whenever the building is open. Please check the current hours of opening as the library is operating on an interim break schedule.





UW Activists and the Farmworkers’ Movement

8 04 2011

Antonio Salazar's photographs of Chicano activists form the core of this exhibit.

UW Activists and the Farmworkers’ Movement

Special Collections, Allen Library South Basement :: April – June 2011

A new Labor Archives of Washington State, UW Special Collections exhibit illustrating the history of activism on the UW campus featuring the photographs of Antonio Salazar, artifacts from Professor Erasmo Gamboa’s personal collection and material from the UW Libraries Special Collections.

For more information, visit the event website.





Seattle Camera Club Exhibition at the Henry

11 02 2011

 

“Into the Library,” undated photograph by Frank A. Kunishige. Frank Kunishige Photograph Collection. PH Coll 343. Special Collections Division. University of Washington Libraries.

You also can go out of the library and head over to the Henry Art Gallery for this evening’s reception and panel discussion for the opening of the exhibition, Shadows of a Fleeting World: Pictorial Photography and the Seattle Camera Club. The show draws heavily on material from Special Collections, including the Frank Kunishige Photograph Collection (PH Coll 343) and the Kyo Koike Photograph Collection (PH Coll 262). The panel discussion, features Henry Chief Curator, Elizabeth Brown, as well as David F. Martin and Special Collections Visual Materials Curator, Nicolette Bromberg, who co-authored the catalog for the exhibition. The event begins at 7:00 P.M. in the Henry Auditorium; it is free with museum admission or membership, but seating is limited.

If you can’t make it tonight, the exhibition runs from February 12 – May8, 2011.





A Scrapbook By Any Other Name?

19 02 2010

"Mixed Pickles," leaf from the Westmoreland Album (1864/70), watercolor and ink photocollage designed by Victoria Alexandrina Anderson-Pelham, Countess of Yarborough and Eva Macdonald.

While back visiting New York recently, I unexpectedly encountered this delightful exhibition during a routine trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, Playing with Pictures: The Art of Victorian Photocollage displays the heretofore little known work of nineteenth century women who compiled these meticulously crafted albums, which contain individual leaves that creatively and often humorously juxtapose and incorporate cut up pieces of studio portrait photography within the artist’s own watercolor designs.

Do these sound like scrapbooks to you?

While I don’t think we have any examples in our collection of scrapbooks that are quite as classy, we have uncovered some pretty interesting ones during the course of the ongoing scrapbook cataloging and preservation project.

And who knows what wonders may be found among the Special Collections Division’s collection of photographic albums?  You may get your chance to ask, when Visual Materials Curator, Nicolette Bromberg, gives a presentation on the photographs of Viretta Denny at the next Seattle Area Archivists membership meeting on March 11, 2010.  You can read more about that event on their blog.

In the meantime, I have checked out the Libraries’ only copy of the exhibition catalog of the photocollage show, but promise to return it soon.





Final AYPE Exhibit Tour Tonight

14 10 2009
Former AYPE Forestry building being demolished, 1930.

Former AYPE Forestry building being demolished, 1930.

This evening marks your last chance for a free tour of The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition: When the World Came to Campus, led by exhibit curator, Carla Rickerson.  No RSVP or pre-registration is necessary for this one-hour event.  Just show up at 6:00 pm in the Suzzallo Library Exhibition Room 102 (just inside the main entrance to the building).

Image credit: Post AYPE Building Collection. PH Coll 778.  University of Washington Libraries Digital Collections Order no. UWCO159





UW AYPE Exhibit Tours

7 07 2009

A reminder that the first of three free public tours of the  exhibit, “The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition:  When the World Came to the Campus,” led by Carla Rickerson, Head of Public Services,  will take place this Wednesday evening, July 8, from 6:00-7:00 pm in Suzzallo 102.

Additional tours are scheduled for August 12 and October 14 — same time, same location.

No RSVP or pre-registration is required.  For more information about the exhibit, go to http://uwnews.org/uweek/article.aspx?visitsource=uwkmail&id=50023








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