Courage in Action – Day of Remembrance Symposium on Gordon Hirabayashi

20 02 2014

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Join us for the 2014 Day of Remembrance, Saturday, February 22, 2014 to honor the life and legacy of civil rights icon Gordon K. Hirabayashi.  The symposium (free and open to the public) from 1:00 to 5:00 in Kane Hall on the UW campus will feature lectures, performances and remembrances by the Hirabayashi family, and the presentation of Hirabayashi’s Presidential Medal of Freedom, awarded posthumously to Hirabayashi by President Obama in 2012.

The medal will be part of the Gordon K. Hirabayashi papers in Special Collections.  His journals, photographs, letters and legal papers were donated last year by his family and many items are on display in the Allen Library North Lobby in an exhibit titled “Civil Disobedience!”  The exhibit ends February 28.

There also will be book-signing in Kane Hall’s Walker Ames Room from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. by Lane Hirabayashi, co-author of the 2013 University of Washington Press book “A Principled Stand: The Story of Gordon Hirabayashi.”

In a related event, a play by about Hirabayashi titled “Hold These Truths,” by Jeanne Sakata, featuring actor Greg Watanabe, will be given a staged reading at Theater Off Jackson, Feb. 22 and 23.





Exhibit on Gordon Hirabayashi

5 02 2014

Civil Disobedience!
The Life and Legacy of Gordon K. Hirabayashi

Exhibit from University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections, Pacific Northwest Collection

Date: February 3 through 28, 2014

Allen Library North Lobby

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During World War II, 24 year-old University of Washington student Gordon Hirabayashi defied the United States order for Americans of Japanese ancestry to leave the West Coast for concentration camps.  He turned himself in to the FBI and was tried and convicted in the Federal District Court of Seattle. The case ultimately went to the Supreme Court where it was upheld.  After the war, Hirabayashi completed a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Washington, and went on to teach at American University in Beirut, American University in Cairo, and at the University of Alberta in Canada.

It was some 40 years later that Gordon Hirabayashi’s wartime conviction was overturned in an extraordinary case that exposed the suppression and alteration of evidence by the government.  Gordon’s principled stand to uphold the Constitution for all Americans is a legacy to be preserved. The story has  been documented in dozens of academic publications, documentaries, and theater productions.  Gordon dedicated his life to keeping the story of the injustice of Japanese American incarceration alive.  In May of 2012, five months after his death, he posthumously received the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

In 2013, the personal papers of Gordon Hirabayashi were donated to the Pacific Northwest Collection of the University of Washington Libraries Special Collections.  They join a growing collection of papers, oral histories, and photographs that help document the Japanese American experience in the Pacific Northwest.  This exhibit features items from his papers, including his prison diaries and photographs documenting his life.   The Gordon K. Hirabayashi Papers will be open for research  on February 24, 2014 in Special Collections.

Items from other collections featured in the exhibit are:

The Ring Family Papers, Acc. 4241, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections.  Many letters from this collection are digitized and available online.

The S. Frank Miyamoto Collection, Acc. 2485, University of Washington Libraries Special Collections

Other Events:

The exhibit is in coordination with the upcoming symposium entitled Courage in Action:  A Symposium on the Life and Legacy of Gordon K. Hirabayashi,  for 2014 Day of Remembrance, February 22, 2014.  More information online here.

Hold These Truths, a play by Jeanne Sakata. Solo staged reading at Theatre off Jackson, concurrent with the SPF 8 Solo Performance Festival. Feb. 22 at 7:30 p.m. and Feb. 23 at 2 p.m. $15 general admission/$10 seniors and students.
Tickets and information available here.





PNW Historians Guild Event – New Research Lectures – Jan. 15

15 01 2014

New research on the history and landscape of the Pacific Northwest will be presented by three graduate students from UW’s History Department and College of the Built Environment.

Wednesday, Jan 15, 2014 6:00-8:00 pm at the University of Washington – Suzzallo Library Maps/Special Collections Classroom, B89.  Call 206-543-1929 for information.

The event is free and open to the public.

Gig Harbor Grange #445 in Pierce County. Photo: Holly Taylor

Holly Taylor, a graduate student in the University of Washington College of the Built Environment’s Interdisciplinary PhD program and principal of Past Forward, a consulting company specializing in historic preservation projects in the Pacific Northwest, will be sharing findings from her recently completed Master’s Thesis, “Grange Halls in Washington State: A Critical Investigation of a Vernacular Building Type.”

Her presentation will examine Progressive-era history of the Grange, consider why Washington State has more Grange members at present than any other state, and explore preservation issues related to the Order’s rural and small-town community halls.

Ross Coen, a graduate student in the History Department at the University of Washington and the author of Breaking Ice for Arctic Oil The Epic Voyage of the SS Manhattan Through the Northwest Passage (University of Alaska Press, 2012) will present a paper entitled “Owning the Ocean: Environment and Identity in the Bristol Bay (Alaska) Salmon Fishery, 1930 to 1938.”

Patricia Gauthier, also a graduate student in History at the University of Washington, will share her work “Far From the Center of Charities: Chemawa Indian School and the Gendered Display of the ‘New Indian’, 1880 to 1905.”





Labor Archives of Washington Event: Public Screening and Talk: One Generation’s Time: The Legacy of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes, October 31

28 10 2013

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One Generation’s Time: The Legacy of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes tells the story of Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes, two Filipino American cannery worker activists who were murdered in Seattle in June 1981.

A free screening* of the one-hour documentary will take place, Thursday, October 31, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Museum of History and Industry, 860 Terry Ave N Seattle, WA 98109 (206) 324-1126 ext 165

Admission to the preview screening is free, however seating is limited. Doors open at 6:00 p.m.; screening at 6:10 p.m.; followed by a post-film discussion led by Seattle Channel Senior Producer.

*The screening is free but does not include museum admission. People attending the event may proceed to the screening; regular admission rates will apply only for those who wish to visit MOHAI’s galleries before the event. People attending the event to proceed to the screening but not MOHAI’s galleries.

Speakers:

Shannon Gee, who wrote, directed, photographed and edited the documentary.
Ron Chew, documentary co-producer, author of the companion book Remembering Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes: The Legacy of Filipino Labor Activism, published earlier this year by University of Washington Press.
Conor Casey, Labor Archivist from the Labor Archives of Washington, will speak about some of the archival collections that were used in the documentary and to talk about the new Cannery Worker Unions section of the Labor Archives Digital Collections Portal.

Domingo and Viernes, two reform officers in Seattle’s Alaska Cannery Workers’ Union, Local 37 of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU), were gunned down as they worked in the union offices near Pioneer Square. The men were attempting to reform the union and were calling for better working conditions in the canneries. On the surface, their murders were meant to look like just another gang-related slaying, but later were revealed to be a hit originating from the Marcos regime.

The documentary details the murders, the fight for fair labor conditions, the civil rights movement the murdered men helped foster and the ensuing efforts to seek justice for their killings.

Chew will sign copies of his book, which will be available for purchase, at the screening.

Co-Sponsors: Labor Archives of Washington, the Pacific Northwest Historians Guild, Seattle Channel, Inlandboatmen’s Union of the Pacific, the Museum of History and Industry, and the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies





Klondike Trek: The John Hinkle Letters, Journal and Drawings

25 10 2013

South Edmonton, Alberta Canada
Sunday, April 17th, 1898

My Dear Mollie, and Myrty and Boys,

Thus begins the first letter in a recent addition of materials originating with James Hinkle, one of the thousands of people who joined the Klondike Gold Rush of 1898. The collection was a gift from his great-granddaughter, Marcia Bates in April 2013.

James “Jim” Hinkle (1852-1899) was a telegraph operator and railroad engineer from Mattoon, Illinois before deciding to become a gold prospector. After word of gold being found in the Klondike had reached Illinois, several people in Mattoon formed a company with the purpose of sending a small group of people to the gold fields.  Hinkle and his two partners took an overland route through Edmonton, Alberta before deciding to search for gold in northeastern British Columbia.

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During his trek he wrote letters home to wife Mollie and children Myrtle, Harry, and Vernon. Hinkle’s letters home to his family included rich descriptions of his experiences in the Canadian wilderness and include many drawings and diagrams of the areas where he and his colleagues spent time.  In many letters he included lively and detailed pencil sketches, like in his May 1899 letter to Mollie, where we find a bird’s eye view of his encampment near a river, including the layout of the cabin and the boat launch (above).

Sadly, before he could strike it rich, Hinkle drowned while crossing a river, but his letters and journal describing his experiences were passed down from his daughter to his granddaughter, Martha Bates, who transcribed them for publication as a book. Although Martha was unable to publish the book during her lifetime her daughter, Marcia Bates, published the manuscript in 2008 as a book entitled Klondike Trek: Jim Hinkle’s Life in the Gold Rush of 1898.

Highlights of the collection include: letters, drawings and journals, all by James Hinkle during his travels; letters between his associates and family members; photographs; and other research materials used by Martha and Marcia Bates in preparing Klondike Trek.

The collection was processed and many of the letters (and their transcriptions)  have been digitized by Jason Moore and are available via the Libraries’ Special Collections Digital Collections. James Hinkle’s digitized letters

The finding aid for the manuscript collection is online here. James Hinkle papers collection guide

Post prepared by Jason R. Moore and Anne Jenner, PNW Curator





New to the PNW Collection

12 10 2013

A new year has begun, and we welcome three new graduate student assistants to the PNW team: Amanda Demeter and Erika Kerr are both first-year students in the iSchool, and Jen MacDowell is a first-year Museology student. Their work includes assisting to accession and process manuscript collections and to process new books and serials. Each student will join me in new efforts to promote the materials in our collection.

To start with we bring you some new titles being added to the collection. These books—some that are newly-published, and some just new to us—fall into a wide range of categories, from regional non-fiction to the outdoors and the environment, and from anthropology to poetry. Come by Special Collections to look at these new titles (some may be in the Libraries general collection http://www.lib.washington.edu/), or add one to your own collection!

Anthropology

People of the Middle Fraser Canyon by Anna Marie Prentiss and Ian Kuijt

A study of archaeological sites in the Middle Fraser Canyon in British Columbia enables Prentiss and Kuijt to tell the history of the St’át’imc, or Upper Lillooet, people from 8000 years ago to the present.

They Called Me Number One: Secrets and Survival at an Indian Residential School by Bev Sellars

Xat’sūll chief Bev Sellars, as well as her mother and grandmother, attended the St. Joseph’s Mission at Williams Lake, British Columbia, where they were forced to conform to an unfamiliar culture.

White Grizzly Bear’s Legacy: Learning to Be Indian by Lawney L. Reyes

A blend of history and autobiography, this is the story of the author’s early life in the Indian village of Inchelium, which was destroyed by the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam.

Autobiography

Waiting to Be Heard: A Memoir by Amanda Knox

Drawn from the journals and letters she kept during her time in prison, Knox shares her story in this new memoir.

Outdoors and the Environment

Full Rip 9.0: The Next Big Earthquake in the Pacific Northwest by Sandi Doughton

Scientists predict that the next big earthquake in North America will happen here—and that this earthquake might be long past its anticipated date.

Home to the Nechako: The River and the Land by June Wood

The Nechako River has transformed drastically due to the construction of dams and other environment-altering projects. Wood tells about the land and the communities that were affected by the river’s change.

Land Snails and Slugs of the Pacific Northwest by Thomas E. Burke

This book has been called “the definitive and comprehensive guide to the snails and slugs of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Western Montana.”

Northern Exposure: An Adventuring Career in Stories and Images by Jonathan Waterman

Praised as “a call to action…to protect the North,” this book of striking images and engaging stories transports the reader to the Northern wilderness.

Oil and Water by Mei Mei Evans

This novel about an oil spill of the Alaskan town of Selby is influenced by the author’s own experience during the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

Poetry

To Curve by Michael Daley

This book of poetry moves seamlessly between the past and the present.

Regional Non-Fiction

Boom Towns & Relic Hunters of Washington State: Exploring Washington’s Historic Ghost Towns & Mining Camps by Jerry Smith

Visitors to Northeastern Washington can find themselves traveling through long-lost and forgotten ghost towns and historic sites that were once home to miners, prospectors, and pioneers.

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown

In 1936, the University of Washington’s crew team—composed of nine working-class boys—drew new attention to the sport as they competed to win gold at the Berlin Olympics.

Douglas County Chronicles: History from the Land of One Hundred Valleys by R.J. Guyer

This collection of stories tells the rich history of the communities in Douglas County, Oregon.

Ghost Towns of the Pacific Northwest by Phillip Varney

The maps, histories, photographs, and detailed directions included in this book will help readers plan a trip to these towns throughout Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia.

Journal of Everett and Snohomish County History, Winter 1982

This special issue features an index of Everett photographers from 1890 to 1935.

Murder and Mayhem in Portland, Oregon by JD Chandler

This book tells the gritty details behind many of Portland’s infamous crimes.

The Last Great Stand: Some Interesting Sidelights on the Pacific Northwest Lumber Industry

Facts about the logging in the Pacific Northwest fill this 1922 publication.

Vacation Land: The National Forests in Oregon produced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, 1919

Be inspired to visit Oregon’s National Forests as your read how they were described almost one hundred years ago.

Washington: Our Home published by Gibbs Smith Education

Learn about the history of Washington and its people, both past and present, with this textbook.

 

Jen MacDowell with Anne Jenner, PNW Curator





Labor Archives of Washington Saves Labor History, Wins Major Award

22 07 2013

Originally posted on Labor Archives of Washington:

Labor Archivist Conor Casey and AFL-CIO's Jennifer Dorning at the Sessions Award Ceremony in Chicago, June 2013.

Labor Archivist Conor Casey and AFL-CIO’s Jennifer Dorning at the Sessions Award Ceremony in Chicago, June 2013.

Five years ago, labor history in Washington State was facing a crisis. Labor activists and unions played central roles in the region’s history, but the evidence of their accomplishments was being lost. Their papers and records were being thrown away forever, or when saved, sitting forgotten in local libraries.

Recognizing the urgent need to preserve and share its history, Washington’s labor movement, teamed with the University of Washington’s Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies and the University of Washington Libraries, to launch the Labor Archives of Washington. Local unions raised the funds to establish the Labor Archives in 2010. Spearheaded by a 3-year, $150,000 matching grant from the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and a 3-year fundraising campaign by the Washington State Labor Council. County labor councils and unions throughout Washington State have…

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